Welcome! Log In Create A New Profile Recent Messages

Deep Creek Hot Springs

The Moon is Waxing Crescent (8% of Full)


Advanced

Re: SC61

All posts are those of the individual authors and the owner of this site does not endorse them. Content should be considered opinion and not fact until verified independently.

February 15, 2008 10:23PM
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=8070

Imposing the New World Order
Review of F. William Engdahl's "A Century of War"

...................A New Millennium for Oil Geopolitics

A new president accompanied the new millennium with a changed Washington focus - oil is at its core, controlling it is key, and Dick Cheney's first job as vice-president was working with the (James) Baker Institute to draft the April 2001 National Energy Policy Report. It projected a growing dependency on foreign oil, highlighted Iraq's "de-stabilizing influence," and recommended "restat(ing) goals with respect to Iraq policy." It also linked the Pentagon with future energy policy plans.

Core report recommendations signalled how with a crystal clear message:

-- securing foreign sources is key;

-- less than cooperative governments in volatile parts of the world control some of the largest sources; and

-- Cheney highlighted concern at a private 1999 London Institute of Petroleum meeting saying: "by 2010 we will need on the order of an additional fifty million barrels a day."

He didn't flinch saying where we'd get it: "the Middle East, with two-thirds of the world's oil and the lowest cost, is still where the prize ultimately lies...." and Iraq is the potential crown jewel with the largest of all untapped low-hanging fruit. Immediately on entering the White House, Cheney & Co. swung into action. They focused on Iraq like a laser, targeted Saddam Hussein, and removing him from office became top goal.

Washington teems with schemes and intrigue, but a neoconservative think tank was particularly diabolical. Established in 1997, it was called the Project for the New American Century (PNAC), its goal was unchallengeable US dominance, and a policy paper was drafted to achieve it. It appeared in 2000 and was called "Rebuilding America's Defenses: Strategies, Forces and Resources for a New Century." It stated that "America should seek to preserve and extend its position of global leadership by maintaining the preeminence of US military forces." It further called for "American hegemony" and "full-spectrum dominance," and believed achieving it would be long-term "absent some catastrophic and catalyzing event - like a new Pearl Harbor."

A rogues gallery of PNAC members joined the Bush administration in 2001, key among them Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Wolfowitz, and topping their goals was removing Saddam Hussein. September 11 obliged, the "war on terror" was born, "terrorism" replaced communism as the new enemy, its core was in the oil-rich Middle East, and its headquarters was in Iraq. Removing the Taliban was just a warm-up for the main event ahead. It was conceived before bin Laden was "Enemy Number One" and overnight Al-Queda became western civilization's greatest threat.

On October 7, 2001 (four weeks after 9/11), America went to war. Target One was Afghanistan, controlling Central Asian oil was the goal, transporting it through Afghanistan was the plan, and the Taliban had to go because they rejected one-way Washington (double) deal making. They fled Kabul five weeks later, Northern Alliance warlords took over, a puppet president was installed, war ended (for a time), and the focus shifted to Iraq.

Prepping the public began, Saddam became another Hitler, his WMDs threatened western civilization, so he had to go. "Shock and awe" began on March 19, 2003, and Baghdad fell three weeks later. Saddam was removed, fighting "officially" ended in May, and to almost no one's surprise, no WMDs were found because they're weren't any, and that was known by the mid-1990s or earlier.

Paul Wolfowitz attended an unreported Singapore security conference in June. He was asked why America chose WMDs as a causis belli when none existed. He answered it was "the only thing we could agree on." He was also asked why Iraq was targeted, not North Korea and its nuclear threat, and he explained: "The country swims on a sea of oil" so there was no other choice with world supply running out.

That conclusion came out of an alarming September 9, 2001 Oil Depletion Analysis Centre energy policy memo to Tony Blair. It highlighted "hydrocarbon difficulties," declining output, and importance of Iraq as the one remaining untapped oil-rich country. Securing it was key because credible geological reports argued that easy cheap oil was dramatically declining while global demand was rising, especially in emerging China and India. For almost a century, world economic growth needed cheap, plentiful oil. No good substitute exists so controlling what's left is essential.

Further, if "peak oil" has been reached, as many believe, its cost will explode, and one analyst predicted: "Beyond 2005, the energy required to find and extract a barrel of oil will exceed the energy contained in the barrel." Further, he estimated most major oil sources are near or at peak, for every new barrel discovered, four are being used, and the only cheap untapped supply left is in the Middle East where around two-thirds of proved reserves remain. Five regional countries are key - Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iran, the Gulf Emirates (notably Qatar) and Iraq above all with estimates that its potential may be 432 billion barrels or around two-thirds more than Saudi Arabia's proved reserves.

If true, Iraq's importance is vital, its real estate is the world's most valuable, and controlling it unchallenged means "Washington (holds) the trump cards over all potential economic rivals," friends and foes. Even more grandiose would be to control every major and potential worldwide oil source and transport route to achieve unimaginable omnipotence. It would be a global-scale chokehold to decide who gets supply, who doesn't, how much and at what price. It would thereby assure who controls world economic development and remains Number One.

Unchallengeable military power is key and the reason the Bush administration repositioned its global presence through a web of new bases. They've been strategically placed where Cold War geopolitics didn't permit. Unsurprisingly, they target Eurasia and its importance Zbigniew Brzezinski highlighted in his 1997 book, "The Grand Chessboard." He referred to the region as the "center of world power extending from Germany and Poland in the East through Russia and China to the Pacific and including the Middle East and Indian subcontinent." Dominating it assures the US access to and control of its vast energy reserves, so that becomes Goal One.

But it doesn't exclude broader aims, including Africa that will supply around one-fourth of future US oil supply, according to some analysts. It explains the Pentagon's AFRICOM presence that's expected to be fully operational by late summer and be responsible for the entire continent and its valued resources that include more than energy.

Swing over to Latin America and its energy potential. Countries like Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil and Mexico are very much in US plans with the Bolivarian Republic far and away most important. According to Hugo Chavez and some US estimates, the country has more potential reserves than Saudi Arabia when its heavy oil is included. It explains SOUTHCOM'S mission and command over 30 regional countries with a growing presence in a number of them and ongoing operations (some covert) throughout Latin America.

Engdahl ends his book discussing oil's importance to US "full spectrum dominance." Controlling it directly or indirectly through client regimes means holding "a true weapon of mass destruction (and) potential blackmail over the rest of the world. Who would dare challenge the dollar" as the world's reserve currency? And if IMF rules keep restraining developing countries' growth, their oil demand will be curbed, so all the more for America and its key Global North allies at a time when most world oil sources have peaked. More than ever then, controlling world energy reserves is crucial to maintaining economic growth.

The 1970s oil shocks were warning shots. Today, threatened shortfalls are real and worsening. We call controlling world supply promoting democracy, others see the subterfuge, and some critics feel our imperial arrogance defines our weakness. Today, America is unrivaled in global power, and Engdahl quoted the late Edward Said after Iraq's invasion saying: "Every single empire (says) it is not like all the others, that (it's special), that it has a mission to enlighten, civilize, bring order and democracy (and only use) force as a last resort." It remains to be seen what's ahead in "the New American Century," but the evidence so far isn't encouraging, and that's putting it mildly......................
SubjectAuthorViewsPosted

SC61

Wizard 642February 06, 2008 10:49PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 1101February 06, 2008 11:35PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 406February 08, 2008 11:55PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 482February 11, 2008 01:44PM

Re: SC61

Paul P. 500February 11, 2008 03:43PM

Re: SC61

mojavegreen 457February 13, 2008 11:01AM

Re: SC61

Paul P. 464February 13, 2008 12:57PM

Re: SC61

mojavegreen 411February 14, 2008 01:18PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 423February 13, 2008 07:59PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 435February 13, 2008 10:55PM

Re: SC61

Paul P. 432February 14, 2008 05:59PM

Re: SC61

mojavegreen 488February 15, 2008 10:14AM

Re: SC61

Wizard 403February 14, 2008 09:39PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 430February 14, 2008 10:19PM

Re: SC61

Wizard 894February 15, 2008 10:23PM



Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login